NJ Laws Directions to Ken Vercammen and Associates Ken Vercammens Resume Ken Vercammen articles

Kenneth Vercammen & Associates
A Law Office with Experienced Attorneys for Your New Jersey Legal Needs

2053 Woodbridge Ave.
Edison NJ 08817
732-572-0500
1-800-655-2977

Personal Injury and Criminal
on Weekends 732-261-4005

Princeton Area
68 South Main St.
Cranbury, NJ 08512
By Appointment Only
Toll Free 800-655-2977


NJ Court Rule 3:4-1 Procedure After Arrest

Kenneth Vercammen's Law office represents individuals charged with criminal and serious traffic violations throughout New Jersey.

Court Rule 3:4-1. Procedure After Arrest

(a) Arrest Without Warrant. (1) Preparation of Complaint. A law enforcement officer shall take a person who was arrested without a warrant to a police station where a complaint shall be prepared immediately. If it appears that issuance of a warrant is authorized by Rule 3:3-1(c) or the prosecution of the person would be jeopardized by immediate release, the complaint may be prepared on a Complaint-Warrant (CDR2) form. Otherwise, the complaint shall be prepared on a Complaint-Summons (CDR1) form. (2) Issuance of Process. If a Complaint-Summons (CDR1) has been prepared, the law enforcement officer may serve the summons and release the defendant. If a Complaint-Warrant (CDR2) has been prepared, without unnecessary delay, and no later than 12 hours after arrest, the matter shall be presented to a judge, or, in the absence of a judge, to a judicial officer who has the authority to set bail for the offense charged. The judicial officer shall determine whether to issue a warrant or summons as provided in Rule 3:3-1, and if a warrant is issued, shall set bail immediately. (b) Arrest on Warrant. If bail was not set when the arrest warrant was issued, the person who is arrested on that warrant shall have bail set without unnecessary delay, and no later than 12 hours after arrest. (c) Identification procedures. If the defendant has been released on a summons, any post-arrest identification procedures required by N.J.S.A 53:1-15 or otherwise required by law, shall be completed on the return date of the summons.

Note: Source-R.R. 3:2-3(a), 8:3-3(a). Amended July 7, 1971 to be effective September 13, 1971; caption amended, former rule redesignated as paragraph (a) and paragraphs (b) and (c) adopted July 21, 1980 to be effective September 8, 1980; paragraph (b) amended July 16, 1981 to be effective September 14, 1981; paragraphs (a) and (b) amended, new paragraph (c) adopted and former paragraph (c) redesignated paragraph (d) and paragraph (d)(7) deleted November 5, 1986 to be effective January 1, 1987; paragraphs (b) and (c) amended April 10, 1987 to be effective immediately; paragraph (b) amended January 5, 1988 to be effective February 1, 1988; captions added to paragraphs (a)(b) and (c), new paragraph (c) adopted, paragraph (d) introductory text deleted and paragraphs (d)(1)(2)(3)(4)(5) and (6) redesignated as paragraphs (b)(1)(a)(b)(c)(d) and (f) and paragraph (1)(e) amended and paragraphs (b)(2) and (3) adopted, July 13, 1994 to be effective January 1, 1995; paragraph (a) amended and redesignated as paragraph (b), paragraph (b) amended and redesignated as paragraph (a), paragraph (c) deleted, and new paragraph (c) adopted July 5, 2000 to be effective September 5, 2000. 3:4-2. First Appearance After Filing of Complaint

(a) Time of First Appearance. Without unnecessary delay, following the filing of a complaint the defendant shall be brought before a judge for a first appearance as provided in this Rule. If the defendant remains in custody, the first appearance shall occur within 72 hours after arrest, excluding holidays, and shall be before a judge with authority to set bail for the offenses charged. (b) Procedure in Indictable Offenses. At the defendant's first appearance before a judge, if the defendant is charged with an indictable offense, the judge shall: (1) give the defendant a copy of the complaint and inform the defendant of the charge; (2) inform the defendant of the right to remain silent and that any statement may be used against the defendant; (3) inform the defendant of the right to retain counsel and, if indigent, the right to be represented by the public defender; (4) ask the defendant specifically whether he or she wants counsel and record the defendant's answer on the complaint; (5) if the defendant asserts indigence, and does not affirmatively, and with understanding, waive the right to counsel, assure that the defendant completes the appropriate application form for public defender services and files it with the criminal division manager's office; (6) inform the defendant that there is a pretrial intervention program and where and how an application to it may be made; (7) inform the defendant of his or her right to have a hearing as to probable cause and of his or her right to indictment by the grand jury and trial by jury, and if the offense charged may be tried by the court upon waiver of indictment and trial by jury, the court shall so inform the defendant. All such waivers shall be in writing, signed by the defendant, and shall be filed and entered on the docket. If the complaint charges an indictable offense which cannot be tried by the court on waiver, it shall not ask for or accept a plea to the offense; and, (8) admit the defendant to bail as provided in Rule 3:26. (c) Procedure in Non-Indictable Offenses. At the defendant's first appearance before a judge, if the defendant is charged with an non-indictable offense, the judge shall: (1) give the defendant a copy of the complaint and inform the defendant of the charge; (2) inform the defendant of the right to remain silent and that any statement may be used against the defendant; (3) inform the defendant of the right to retain counsel and, if indigent and entitled by law to the appointment of counsel, the right to be represented by a public defender or assigned counsel; and (4) assign counsel, if the defendant is indigent and entitled by law to the appointment of counsel, and does not affirmatively, and with understanding, waive the right to counsel. (d) Trial of Indictable Offenses in Municipal Court. If a defendant who is charged withan indictable offense that may be tried in Municipal Court is brought before a Municipal Court, that court may try the matter provided that the defendant waives the rights to indictment and trial by jury. The waivers shall be in writing, signed by the defendant, and approved by the county prosecutor, and retained by the Municipal Court.

Note: Source-R.R. 3:2-3(b), 8:4-2 (second sentence). Amended July 7, 1971 effective September 13, 1971; amended April 1, 1974 effective immediately; text of former Rule 3:4-2 amended and redesignated paragraphs (a) and (b) and text of former Rules 3:27-1 and -2 amended and incorporated into Rule 3:4-2, July 13, 1994 to be effective January 1, 1995; paragraphs (a) and (b) amended June 28, 1996 to be effective September 1, 1996; paragraph (b) amended January 5, 1998 to be effective February 1, 1998; caption amended, paragraphs (a) and (b) deleted, new paragraphs (a), (b), (c), and (d) adopted July 5, 2000 to be effective September 5, 2000.

Consequences of a Criminal Guilty Plea

1. You will have to appear in open court and tell the judge what you did that makes you guilty of the particular offense(s)

2. Do you understand that if you plead guilty:

a. You will have a criminal record

b. You may go to Jail or Prison.

c. You will have to pay Fines and Court Costs.

3. If you are on Probation, you will have to submit to random drug and urine testing. If you violate Probation, you often go to jail.

4. In indictable matters, you will be required to provide a DNA sample, which could be used by law enforcement for the investigation of criminal activity, and pay for the cost of testing.

5. You must pay restitution if the court finds there is a victim who has suffered a loss and if the court finds that you are able or will be able in the future to pay restitution.

6. If you are a public office holder or employee, you can be required to forfeit your office or job by virtue of your plea of guilty.

7. If you are not a United States citizen or national, you may be deported by virtue of your plea of guilty.

8. You must wait 5-10 years to expunge a first offense. 2C:52-3

9. You could be put on Probation.

10. In Drug Cases, a mandatory DEDR penalty of $500-$1,000, and lose your driver's license for 6 months - 2years. You must pay a Law Enforcement Officers Training and Equipment Fund penalty of $30.

11. You may be required to do Community Service.

12. You must pay a minimum Violent Crimes Compensation Board assessment of $50 ($100 minimum if you are convicted of a crime of violence) for each count to which you plead guilty.

13. You must pay a $75 Safe Neighborhood Services Fund assessment for each conviction.

14. If you are being sentenced to probation, you must pay a fee of up to $25 per month for the term of probation.

15. You lose the presumption against incarceration in future cases. 2C:44-1

16. You may lose your right to vote.

The defense of a person charged with a criminal offense is not impossible. There are a number of viable defenses and arguments which can be pursued to achieve a successful result. Advocacy, commitment, and persistence are essential to defending a client accused of a criminal offense.

Jail for Crimes and Disorderly Conduct:

If someone pleads Guilty or is found Guilty of a criminal offense, the following is the statutory Prison/Jail terms.

NJSA 2C: 43-8 (1) In the case of a crime of the first degree, for a specific term of years which shall be fixed by the court and shall be between 10 years and 20 years;

(2) In the case of a crime of the second degree, for a specific term of years which shall be fixed by the court and shall be between five years and 10 years;

(3) In the case of a crime of the third degree, for a specific term of years which shall be fixed by the court and shall be between three years and five years;

(4) In the case of a crime of the fourth degree, for a specific term which shall be fixed by the court and shall not exceed 18 months.

2C:43-3 Fines have been increased recently! 2C:43-3. Fines and Restitutions. A person who has been convicted of an offense may be sentenced to pay a fine, to make restitution, or both, such fine not to exceed:

a. (1) $200,000.00 when the conviction is of a crime of the first degree;

(2) $150,000.00 when the conviction is of a crime of the second degree;

b. (1) $15,000.00 when the conviction is of a crime of the third degree;

(2) $10,000.00 when the conviction is of a crime of the fourth degree;

c. $1,000.00, when the conviction is of a disorderly persons offense;

d. $500.00, when the conviction is of a petty disorderly persons offense;

If facing any criminal charge, retain an experienced attorney immediately to determine you rights and obligations to the court. Current criminal charge researched by Kenneth Vercammen, Esq. 732-572-0500


Kenneth Vercammen was the Middlesex County Bar Municipal Court Attorney of the Year
Receive free NJ Laws Email newsletter with current laws and cases

Telephone Consultation Program
New Article of the Week

Meet with an experienced Attorney to handle your important legal needs.
Please call the office to schedule a confidential "in Office" consultation.
Attorneys are not permitted to provide legal advice by email.

Kenneth Vercammens Law office represents individuals charged with criminal, drug offenses, and serious traffic violations throughout New Jersey. Our office helps people with traffic/ municipal court tickets including drivers charged with Driving While Intoxicated, Refusal and Driving While Suspended.

Kenneth Vercammen was the NJ State Bar Municipal Court Attorney of the Year and past president of the Middlesex County Municipal Prosecutors Association.

Criminal and Motor vehicle violations can cost you. You will have to pay fines in court or receive points on your drivers license. An accumulation of too many points, or certain moving violations may require you to pay expensive surcharges to the N.J. DMV [Division of Motor Vehicles] or have your license suspended. Dont give up! The Law Office of Kenneth Vercammen can provide experienced attorney representation for criminal motor vehicle violations.

When your job or drivers license is in jeopardy or you are facing thousands of dollars in fines, DMV surcharges and car insurance increases, you need excellent legal representation. The least expensive attorney is not always the answer. Schedule an appointment if you need experienced legal representation in a traffic/municipal court matter.

Our website www.NJLaws.com provides information on traffic offenses we can be retained to represent people. Our website also provides details on jail terms for traffic violations and car insurance eligibility points. Car insurance companies increase rates or drop customers based on moving violations.

Contact the Law Office of
Kenneth Vercammen & Associates, P.C.
at 732-572-0500
for an appointment.

The Law Office cannot provide legal advice or answer legal questions over the phone or by email. Please call the Law office and schedule a confidential "in office" consultation.

Ken Vercammen articles

Ken Vercammens Resume Directions to Ken Vercammen and Associates



Disclaimer This web site is purely a public resource of general New Jersey information (intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be correct, complete, or up-to-date). It is not intended be a source of legal advice, do not rely on information at this site or others in place of the advice of competent counsel. The Law Office of Kenneth Vercammen complies with the New Jersey Rules of Professional Conduct. This web site is not sponsored or associated with any particular linked entity unless specifically stated. The existence of any particular link is simply intended to imply potential interest to the reader, inclusion of a link should not be construed as an endorsement.

Copyright 2017. Kenneth Vercammen & Associates, P.C.